Category: Uncategorized

Why Is Daddy Talking to the Wall?

Why Is Daddy Talking to the Wall?

This morning (October 18th, 2018) I had the opportunity to present my “New Features and New Speed in SQL 2016 (+) Always On Availability Groups” session remotely to the community of people registered at DataPlatformGeeks.com. DPG is the group behind the Data Platform Summit, which will be at the Radisson Blu in Bangalore from August 22-24, 2019 (pre-conference sessions offered August 19-21). While I certainly hope to submit to DPS in 2019, today was a lot of fun and good chance to speak to their community.

My session began at 5:30 AM Eastern (I’m based in Lexington, Kentucky, USA). That is 3 PM IST. My kids wake up around 6:30 AM to get ready for school. I presented the webinar from my home office and my kids were a bit confused as to why I had my headset on so early in the morning and appeared to be talking directly to my wall. I’ll never cease to be amazed at technology that allows us to share technical content to people halfway around the world – it’s awesome and I’m so fortunate to get opportunities to do this now and then.

I’m actually presenting another session to them on November 15th – I’ll be doing my “Where Should My Data Live (and Why)?” presentation that I gave at PASS Summit 2017. If you’d like to register for that, the link is here. If my session doesn’t interest you, though, go check out their events page to see all the good, free content that they make available throughout the year. For example, Bob Ward and Jonathan Kehayias are the last two sessions before I present on November 15th. Even if you think I’m a bit of a dodgy speaker, you can’t get any better than Bob and Jonathan! Til next time…

Weekday Speaking and Weekend Racing, MVP-style

Weekday Speaking and Weekend Racing, MVP-style

Greetings and thanks for dropping by! I have a couple speaking gigs to mention and a real racing gig to discuss and then I’ll leave you to your actual work instead of reading silly blogs.

I was supposed to head to North Carolina next week to present my “New Features and New Speed in SQL Server 2016 (and 2017) Always On Availability Groups” session to TriPASS in Raleigh. I was also going to use the trip to see some Triangle-area friends and some family in the Asheville area as well, but Hurricane Florence has other ideas and so I’ll be delivering the session remotely provided that the meeting still goes on. At this point, while I’m happy to present the session, I’m focused on the health and well being of all my friends and family in the Carolinas. While Florence’s winds have weakened, the forecasted rain looks quite significant and I’m definitely hoping for the best possible outcome there.

Mother Nature willing, I’ll be presenting my “Where Should My Data Live (and Why)?” session to the Atlanta Microsoft Database Forum on October 8th. I’m excited to speak to that group and looking forward to heading to another area where I have family and friends in the vicinity. If you’re Atlanta-based I encourage you to register here. As an aside, my mom lives north of Atlanta and has expressed an interest in seeing an Atlanta United soccer/football match so I’ll probably take her to the match on 10/6 at 3:30. If you’re an Atlanta United supporter I’d be happy to grab a pint with you pre-match. Feel free to comment below or tweet at me (@sqlatspeed) if you’d like.

Finally, I’m excited to talk about the opportunity I have to run a GTA-class Mustang (picture above) at the 2018 OVR Autumn Classic XXXVII at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course October 13-14. If you’re around Central Ohio, let me know if you’d like to come out. I’d be happy to talk you around the circuit and walk you through the car as well. It’s been a while, but I’m happy to be able to live up to my @sqlatspeed Twitter handle. This is an introductory effort to a potential full-season opportunity next year. My sincere thanks to Win Smith Racing for the opportunity and to FGE Professional Sports Analytics for the support to make this happen.

That’s all the traveling news for now, but I’m proud to say I’ll be doing this traveling as a Microsoft Data Platform MVP. I’m honored to be awarded that designation and I’ll do my level best to maintain it and earn it in the coming year. Stay tuned to my blog for updates on the racing efforts (with in-car video) and an update on my recently announced PASS Summit session as well. Bye for now!

End of Summer Speaking Sessions (also, maybe racecar!)

End of Summer Speaking Sessions (also, maybe racecar!)

I wanted to post a short update to my readers to let you know about my upcoming speaking schedule to wrap up the summer and a couple other interesting things happening in late summer/early fall.

First of all, I’ll be speaking at SQL Saturday Indy on Saturday, August 11. I’ve really enjoyed giving this session (“Where Should My Data Live (and Why)”?) at several different events in both the USA and the EU this year. This session began life as my PASS Summit 2017 session but has evolved thanks to excellent attendee feedback (and continuing consulting engagements) into an interesting look at various clients’ and customers’ moves to and from cloud providers. I really enjoy giving this session and look forward to an interactive crowd at #SQLSatIndy. If you haven’t registered, there are just a few seats left and you can register here.

Following that, I’m really excited that I was selected to present at Azure DataFest Atlanta on Thursday, August 16th. I’ll be giving my “Democratizing Data Analysis: How and Why of Social Media Sentiment Scoring” presentation. I really love this one, and regular readers of the blog will recognize this as my “Men in Blazers Premier League Mood Table talk”. It’s evolved from a POC for a soccer podcast into a really interesting technical talk and platform for discussion and I’m thrilled to be speaking at this event in Alpharetta on 8/16. While I’m still a bit limited with what I can speak about regarding my work with FGE Professional Sports Analytics, this talk will delve into some of those details. If you haven’t yet grabbed a ticket to see me and many other speakers better than I, tickets are available here.

Lastly, plans are really coming into focus regarding my 2018 racing plans. Yes, I realize it’s a bit late, but we still have a third of the year left! I have a few options on the table and sincerely hope to be able to announce something soon. I may even put up a Twitter poll to help me decide which opportunity to select. As always, thanks for reading, and I hope to see you at a speaking event or a racing event soon!

 

Summer Speaking, Then Some Soccer (er, Football)

Summer Speaking, Then Some Soccer (er, Football)

Greetings from Cork, Ireland! I wanted to get a quick post out about my next 3-4 speaking opportunities before I take a little late summer/early fall break from speaking (for a very good reason). We’ll get to that at the end.

First of all, I’m here in Cork, Ireland to speak at SQL Saturday Ireland in a couple of days (June 9th, to be exact). I’m really excited about this opportunity, as it’s the second international SQL Saturday I’ve been able to do this year. I am incredibly grateful for these opportunities to speak to new audiences and will do my very best to not let down the attendees and organizers. Cork has been wonderful in the few hours I’ve been here already and I look forward to a few more hours of exploring Cork tomorrow before the speaker get-together ramps up in the evening. If you haven’t registered for #SQLSATCORK yet, you can do so here.

Following Saturday’s event here in Ireland, I’m thrilled to announce that I’ve been selected to two SQL Saturday events in July which are much closer to home than the roughly 4000 miles it is to my house from where I sit here in Cork. I’ll be speaking at SQL Saturday Louisville on July 21st and SQL Saturday Columbus on July 28th.

Louisville was the first SQL Saturday to ever select me and remain grateful to Chris, John, Mala and the team for that initial selection and the community path it’s put me from that point forward. Beyond my personal feelings for this event and the group behind it, rest assured that Louisville is always a fantastic event with a great speaker list top to bottom despite my repeated selections! If you haven’t registered for the event, click here. I’d also like to plug the pre-conference session from two ex-colleagues of mine (and current Microsoft employees), Brad Ball and Josh Luedeman. These guys are doing very cool, cutting-edge stuff in Azure to really make your data warehouse data come alive to data consumers. Their dovetailing of data visualizations, sentiment analysis, and modern DW techniques is worth a day of your time – register for it here.

This will be my first trip to Columbus for SQL Saturday and I’m excited about that because A) I lived in Westerville for a few years when I was a kid and B) I’m a frequent visitor to Columbus Crew matches with my son so it will be fun to present up there. I’ll also be getting together with my fellow FGE Professional Sports Analytics founder (George Bryant) to watch some football after the event at a Crew pub, so the whole day should be a blast from start to finish. I haven’t been able to speak too much about what George and I are doing with FGE, but if you’re interested in what we’re doing, click here. We’re a bit light on the details there for now, but rest assured there are many blog posts coming from the work he and I are doing. Good bit of our work is under layers of legally enforced silence – for now. That will soon change and I’m eager to share it with you when I can!

Next, I’ve submitted individual sessions to SQL Saturday Indianapolis and I’m eagerly awaiting that schedule to see if I’ve been selected. Even if I miss out on an individual session, I do know that I will be doing a pre-con on Friday, August 10 with my friend and co-worker Sean Werick. It’s titled “Modernize your Data Warehouse” and tickets are available here. It’s always fun to be in Indy even when I’m not at the Speedway so I hope I’ll see you there.

Finally, I’ve submitted to the Atlanta Azure DataFest, held August 16th and 17th at the Microsoft Technology Center in Alpharetta. I’m hoping I am selected for that event because I’ve submitted my Cognitive Services, Azure Logic Apps, sentiment analysis, and soccer/football talk (i.e. the Premier League Mood Table session). That’s received wonderful response where I’ve given it across the USA and the world but it doesn’t always fit neatly into some PASS events so I’m hoping it finds a home at Azure DataFest.

Following that, I won’t be at any SQL Saturdays for a couple months so I can be home on the weekends to see my son play with his U10 club soccer (to some readers)/football (to other readers) team representing Lexington FC. I’m incredibly proud of the level he is able to play the sport that he loves, and despite my woeful lack of talent in that area, I can’t wait to watch him take to the field this fall. Thanks for reading – hopefully more to come soon!

(Halfway) Around the World in 18 Days

(Halfway) Around the World in 18 Days

Greetings! I’m excited for some of the technical posts that I’m working on, but before I’m able to publish those I wanted to share the details of my speaking schedule for May. I’m incredibly fortunate to have these speaking opportunities, and I’m incredibly excited to share them with you and to share my presentations with the attendees at these events!

My epic May begins this weekend with SQL Saturday Jacksonville on May 5th. I’m looking forward to catching up with some friends in the area, but I’m also looking forward to my first presentation in Florida! I’ll be presenting my “How to Keep Your Database Servers Out of the News” session. I really enjoy this session because it lends itself to a lot of interactivity with the group as we talk through various challenges people have had and the questions those challenges bring to their mind. If you’re attending, I look forward to seeing you and hearing your questions. If you’re not attending, click here to register and I’ll see you there!

The following weekend, on May 12th, I’ll be presenting at SQL Saturday Finland in Helsinki. It is an understatement to say that I’m excited for this one. My wife has requested that I bring Kimi Raikkonen home with me, and while I’m pretty sure she’s going to be disappointed in my failure to do that, I’m thrilled that I’m meeting my goal by speaking there! I set a personal goal to do at least one international presentation in 2018 and I’m incredibly grateful to the organizers of SQL Saturday Finland for selecting my session on “New Features and New Speed in SQL Server 2016 (and 2017) Always On Availability Groups”. I last presented this session at SQL Saturday Cleveland in February and it went really well and seemed to help some folks with challenges they were having, so I’m excited to bring this one to an international audience. If you’d like to register, click here to do that.

Following my presentation in Finland, I’m hopping a quick 3-hour flight to England to present “Feelings Quantified – Ranking Football Clubs By Supporter Sentiment” to Tech Nottingham. I’m thrilled that I was able to work this out with the organizers and they’ve been absolutely wonderful to me as we’ve worked to get this setup. This will be the second time I present on the Azure Logic Apps and Azure SQL DB guts of the Men in Blazers Mood Table I blogged about here in December and the first time it will be to a crowd who calls it football instead of soccer. 🙂 When I arrive in London on 5/13 I’m taking a few hours out, before hopping the train to Nottingham, to catch Tottenham’s (my favorite English football club) final match of the season and final match at Wembley Stadium before moving to their new stadium in the fall, so it’s going to be a soccer-ful/football-ful couple of days! Come On You Spurs! If you’re interested in learning more about this event, information can be found here.

After that journey, I head back stateside for a couple days off in New York City before presenting my “Data To Impress Those That Sign The Checks – Azure Logic Apps, Social Media, and Sentiment Analysis” session at SQL Saturday New York City. This session is the American-ized version of my mood table presentation (less soccer emphasis and slightly more technical focus) so it will be interesting for me to present both versions of this talk a few days apart. Also, it is no exaggeration to say that attending SQL Saturday NYC in 2015 changed the course of my career, so I definitely encourage you to register. Click here to do that. The organizers do a great job with this event, it’s in a great city, and I’m very appreciative of being invited to speak at an event that’s been so significant in my professional growth. I hope to see you there!

Lastly, I wrap up my journey right where I’m sitting as I finish this blog: my home office. IDERA Software has been kind enough to invite me to present a Geek Sync on 5/23 with my “Where Should My Data Live (and Why)?”. This session is great for data professionals in an environment where they’re being encouraged to expand the organization’s data estate to the cloud. It offers several real-world examples of how cloud and on-premises deployments can work together and complement each other. We also go over some pros and cons of the cloud vs. on-premises and dispel some myths as well. I hope to “see” you there. Click here to register and hear my run my mouth for an hour on May 23rd!

I know I keep saying it, but I am grateful to the organizers of all of these events for allowing me to speak to their groups. I can’t wait to meet #sqlfamily from other parts of the world, see places I’ve never been, and hopefully share a little knowledge along the way. Thanks for reading and hope to see you at one of these events!

I’m Speaking at SQL Saturday Cincinnati!

I’m Speaking at SQL Saturday Cincinnati!

It’s been a busy month since I last blogged for T-SQL Tuesday #99, but I’m hopeful that my blogging will get a bit more regular once I get through this weekend – and an exciting weekend it will be!

I’ve been fortunate enough to be selected to give both a full-day pre-conference session and a regular session at this weekend’s SQL Saturday Cincinnati. The full-day pre-conference session is on Friday, 3/16/18, and it’s titled “Modernize Your Data Warehouse with Big Data” and I’m presenting it with my colleague Warren Sifre (t). I’m really looking forward to my initial effort at a full-day pre-con!

My regular session is a veteran of a few SQL Saturdays now and it always generates good discussion in the room so I’m hoping for a good turnout and good questions! It’s titled “How to Keep Your Database Servers Out of the News” and I’m looking forward to presenting it at this first edition of SQL Saturday Cincinnati on Saturday, 3/17/18.

I believe the event has reached capacity, but just in case some folks have cancelled, go ahead and register for it here. I hope to see you there!

I’m also hoping to be able to announce soon several speaking engagements in the May/June timeframe. I can’t do so yet, but I’m looking forward to sharing those with my readers, so watch this space if you’re interested in where in the world I’ll be later this spring!

T-SQL Tuesday 99: Racing Brings Me #sqlibrium

T-SQL Tuesday 99: Racing Brings Me #sqlibrium

Thanks to Aaron Bertrand (b|t) for hosting this month’s edition of T-SQL Tuesday, the 99th in the blog party series, and for an interesting topic choice for this edition. You can find Aaron’s T-SQL Tuesday #99 introductory post here, but Aaron gave us a choice this time around: share a passion of ours with the SQL community or write about a favorite/most annoying T-SQL bad habit. While I gave some thought to the technical post, I couldn’t turn down an opportunity to talk about my love for racing and how much I enjoy getting to actually drive a race car a few times each year. Since thinking about, talking about, and planning for racing does help bring some balance to my life, #sqlibrium as Drew coined the term, let’s talk for a few minutes about how cool (and yes, relaxing) it is to drive race cars once in a while.

“There are only three sports: bullfighting, motor racing, and mountaineering; all the rest are merely games.” – Ernest Hemingway

I was a big enough racing dork when I was a kid that I had a t-shirt with this on it when I was in elementary school. I honestly don’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t want to look at, read about, or drive race cars. However, if this post turns into “Matt waxes poetically about racing”, it will be about 5,000 words long and incredibly boring to everybody but me. Put much more simply, while a lot of people look for relaxation from a good hike or a relaxing day on the beach, my beach is at a racetrack. Whether I’m watching the cars, working on them, or driving them, it has a way of clearing my head unlike anywhere else. For the sake of brevity(-ish), I’ll focus the rest of this blog on my on-track exploits, such as they are.

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As you can see, we take this racing stuff quite seriously. The picture is of me waiting on the grid at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in June 2017 before taking to the track for the first of two races. The grid marshals thought it would be funny to give us silly umbrellas to block the sun while we waited – and it was.

That said, this picture does a decent job of showing what my Formula First looks like up close. For those that are interested in the technical specs (which is likely very few of you), the basics are that Formula Firsts are 1600cc air-cooled Volkswagen engines mated to purpose-built open wheel chassis riding on Hoosier R60 tires. Hoosier has been a great sponsor of our U.S. Formula First Championship, which is a 5-6 weekend series that is currently in its 12th year of competition this year. We run at great tracks all over the eastern half of the U.S., from Road America in Wisconsin, to Watkins Glen in New York, to Road Atlanta in Georgia. If you’d like to read more information on the series (and see some great videos), the link is here.

Now that we’ve covered the basics of the car and the series that I race in, you’re probably wondering “what cool stuff have you done in these cars, Matt?”. Now, some of you asking that question may think cool stuff is “what have you won?” and others may think cool stuff is “what have you crashed into?”. I’ll cover both angles before we wrap up this blog, but if you’re just here for the crashes, here’s a picture of a crash I just missed at Indy last year (thanks to Brian Schell for the image).

indy_crash_edited

First, what have I won? I’ve been fortunate enough to win trophies and take podiums (finishing in the top 3) at places like Indy, Watkins Glen, and Road America. Road America (in Elkhart Lake, WI) was my favorite race track (other than Indy) growing up and it still is, which makes this next story particularly frustrating even though it happened 12 years ago. After doing a couple weekends in 2005, I committed to running a full Formula First season in 2006. I went to Road America in the top 3 in championship points and was looking to have a great weekend. I qualified 2nd for the our race on Saturday but, near the end of the first lap, the right-front suspension spectacularly came apart, ending my day quite early and giving my right hand a gnarly bruise to boot. I went into Sunday morning’s qualifying hopeful but still frustrated and qualified 5th – then a clutch problem reared its ugly head towards the end of the session. That sent the crew into a massive thrash to get the clutch replaced, an effort that was completed just minutes before we had to head to grid for the race.

Once the race started, the car was really good. I could run comfortably in the draft and started picking off cars and working my way up the order. With 3 laps to go, I passed for the lead and was leading for the first time in my career! The other driver and I traded the lead (and fast laps) back and forth over those last few laps and, on the last lap, I exited the final turn (turn 14) in the lead. I didn’t get the best launch off the corner, though, and the other driver had a run on me. I put on a within-the-rules blocking move but ended up losing the race by roughly the length of the nose of the car. I was crushed, especially as my wife and dad were there to see it. The picture below was taken just after the race while the top 3 finishers waited in line to make sure our cars met minimum weight. I’m still in the car chatting with the guy who beat me. My wife, as you can see, was not thrilled with the loss (she’s a bit competitive)!

roadamerica_2006_postrace

Our series’ next race that season was at Nelson Ledges in Ohio, and after a solid finish during the Saturday race, I was involved in a nasty crash near the end of Sunday qualifying. I was hit from behind by another driver after sliding through the first turn, and that contact resulted in his left side tires bouncing off my roll bar and then my helmet and him flipping end over end numerous times. The impact cracked the shell of my helmet, so I was incredibly fortunate to only be checked out for a concussion and treated for bruises and scrapes – that could have been far, far worse and it really put the previous race’s frustration into perspective. It did not, though, knock any sense into me and I’ve continued racing through the years (except for a break when the kids were born) as time and budget allowed.

I could go on for hours, but this ~1000 words is long enough. As I said, the racetrack is my beach. I love it and it must be in my blood, because I don’t remember not loving it. Based on the picture below (taken after my 3rd place finish at Indy in 2017), one of my kids might end up writing this same blog post in several years’ time. Thanks for reading – hopefully I’ll see you at the track.

indy_podium_kids

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They Let An Impostor Speak at PASS Summit?

They Let An Impostor Speak at PASS Summit?

Earlier this week the folks at PASS reached out to last year’s speakers asking us to share a story of how speaking at PASS impacted us professionally or personally. The first idea that popped into my head was to blog about how speaking at PASS Summit lends you a bit of unique professional credibility in the SQL Server/Microsoft Data Platform world – because it absolutely does. That said, I figured a lot of folks would blog, tweet, or make videos around exactly that subject and likely handle it more creatively that I would have. So, while speaking at PASS Summit has definitely had a positive impact on me professionally, I decided to blog about what I believe the biggest impact of my speaking at PASS Summit 2017 has been – a weapon I can use to battle impostor syndrome. I saw myself as the impostor I mentioned in the title of this blog.

If you’re unfamiliar with impostor syndrome, it is described (via Wikipedia) as “…a concept describing individuals who are marked by an inability to internalize their accomplishments and a persistent fear of being exposed as a “fraud””. As I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know more and more people in the SQL community over the last few years, I realize that many, if not most, speakers suffer from impostor syndrome. This is true for both first-time speakers and even speakers who would all consider “rockstars” in the community. I remember sitting in a speaker room at a SQL Saturday last year and hearing one of the presenters wonder aloud (as they left the room to give their session) “Is this the day these people figure out I have no idea what I’m talking about?”. I’ve certainly battled this and, while it’s gratifying to realize others struggle with this, that’s not necessarily particular helpful to keeping that “impostor” voice quiet!

When I received the email that I had been selected to speak at PASS Summit 2017 I was sitting with my kids as they finished some homework. They were initially quite alarmed when I screamed and ran down the hallway with my arms in the air. Once I came back to them and explained why I was so excited they looked at me with blank stares for a while until my son said “so people are actually going to pay to hear you talk?”. He was shocked! That was also when it really began to sink in for me what a big deal this was going to be.

While I am always incredibly gratified and humbled when I’m selected to speak at any event, my previous speaking experience has been confined to SQL Saturdays and user groups. Those are wonderful opportunities but, as I often joke at the beginning of my sessions, “you are guaranteed to get your money’s worth from me” because those events are free to attend. If I disappointed an attendee at one of those (and I’m sure I have), I haven’t cost them any money.

While people often describe Summit as a “massive SQL Saturday”, the fact that people were spending their own (or their company’s) hard-earned money to attend ratcheted up the pressure for me. That said, once the talk was complete and I had fielded questions (and some compliments) from the folks that attended, that pressure transformed into some measure of validation. The fact that people spent money to be there and that 60-70 of them took the time to attend and applaud my talk was validating and invigorating to me. Now, when that impostor syndrome voice on my head gets louder, I can remind it that I spoke at PASS Summit. And I hope do it again to keep that voice at bay!

Old Habits Cost You Money

Old Habits Cost You Money

As a consultant, I spend a lot of time with customers whose most significant pain point is what they’re spending on SQL Server licensing. In general, they’re all facing a similar scenario: they’ve found an architecture that works for them and as they scale that out for new clients or new users they continue purchasing the same servers (with the same version and edition of SQL Server) that’s always worked. While there’s nothing wrong with that, eventually management starts asking some questions:

  1. Why do we need all these servers when IT says they’re barely using any CPU?
  2. What do all these servers do?
  3. Why we are using X-year-old software?

As DBAs (especially those of us who wear the architect hat as well), we’re in a constant battle between priorities 1 and 1A: ensuring maximum uptime for our customers and spending the least amount of money to achieve that uptime. Settling for an older architecture on an old version of SQL Server does a great job fulfilling priority 1 but, generally, a poor job fulfilling priority 1A. The more money we spend on licensing, the less we have to spend on training, new hardware, etc.

It’s incumbent on us to keep abreast of the evolution in the SQL Server universe. As we’ve seen, Microsoft has massively accelerated the pace of their development in the SQL Server space, whether we’re talking about the database engine itself or Azure SQL Database or something in-between.

Can your company save money and provide required uptime by a move to Azure? Do you need to upgrade to SQL Server 2016 SP1 but downgrade to Standard now that in-memory OLTP, advanced compression, and greater partitioning functionality no longer require Enterprise Edition? Do you need to use something like ScaleArc to ensure you’re leveraging your complete Always On availability group investment?

This blog would be thousands of words long if I delved into every single option, but my point is a simple one. As things in the SQL Server universe change by the month rather than by the year, we all need to keep up with the latest developments and think about how they might make our job easier and/or our architecture less expensive to license and maintain so our company can spend more money on their most valuable resource – us!

Read blogs, follow SQL Server experts on Twitter, attend SQL Saturdays, and make plans to attend PASS Summit so you can stay on the cutting edge of cost-saving developments. If regular operations and maintenance keep you from having the time to reevaluate your architecture, engage a Microsoft data platform consultant (like me!) to help you in that evolution. We all know old habits die hard, but they can cost you and your company valuable resources as well. Engage with the community to help break out of those old habits (and learn cool things too)!

We Interrupt This SQL Server Programming To Bring You Racing from Indy

We Interrupt This SQL Server Programming To Bring You Racing from Indy

I generally use this blog to let people know about community events where I’m speaking, pass along Microsoft Data Platform-related technical information I’ve found useful, or to participate in T-SQL Tuesday blog parties. For the next few days, however, this blog is going to be home to my updates from my racing debut at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. I’m driving in the Open Wheel World Challenge this weekend and, honestly, I lack the words to describe how cool this is.

Every racing driver (or at least every one that grew up in the Midwest of the United States) dreamed of crossing that yard of bricks in any car. The fact that I am able to run at Indy this weekend, in my own car, with family and good friends supporting me is honestly hard to believe. Hopefully we have a good, clean weekend.

After this Sunday, I plan to revert to more disciplined technical blogging. For the next few days, though, I will update this blog with racing updates as often as I am able. If you’d prefer to follow along on Instagram, please search the hashtags #jaygoracing and #sqlatspeed. Talk to you from the track!